American farmers are growing older. Their land? It switches hands more and more with a mix of development and corporate prowess. But a growing number of millennials — those 20-somethings and 30-somethings just launching into a vastly changing world with new realities — are doing what they can to get into the fields. Here in Taos, we’ve got plenty of young folks anxious to work on the land. This is the first of a series that shares their stories.

Aldo Leopold spent some time in Taos County, in the Tres Piedras area of Carson National Forest. He was the one who penned that iconic conservationist motto, “Think like a mountain.” But some folks in Taos County and across New Mexico are giving people a new challenge — think like a watershed. Specifically, think like the Río Grande watershed and all the lands, rivers, streams, and acequias that exist together to make up one of the most important river ecosystems in the world.

American farmers are growing older. Their land? It switches hands more and more with a mix of development and corporate prowess. But a growing number of millennials — those 20-somethings and 30-somethings just launching into a vastly changing world with new realities — are doing what they can to get into the fields. Here in Taos, we’ve got plenty of young folks anxious to work on the land. This is the first of a series that shares their stories.

Aldo Leopold spent some time in Taos County, in the Tres Piedras area of Carson National Forest. He was the one who penned that iconic conservationist motto, “Think like a mountain.” But some folks in Taos County and across New Mexico are giving people a new challenge — think like a watershed. Specifically, think like the Río Grande watershed and all the lands, rivers, streams, and acequias that exist together to make up one of the most important river ecosystems in the world.